technology

January 18, 2019

The plan -- laid out in the administration’s long-anticipated Missile Defense Review -- stops short of calling for the deployment of hypersonic interceptors and space-based lasers, controversial weapons that reportedly been under consideration. Instead, the review calls for spending more to develop technologies that could be used in these types of weapons.

January 17, 2019

Going into the fourth week of the U.S. government shutdown, its impact goes beyond the some 800,000 federal employees who’ve been furloughed. It’s also having a huge impact on the tech sector in myriad ways, from layoffs to Super Bowl ads. Here are seven ways the shutdown is having an impact on the sector.

January 16, 2019

The Navy is currently analyzing air frames, targeting systems, AI-enabled sensors, new weapons and engine technologies to engineer a new 6th-Generation fighter to fly alongside the F-35 and ultimately replace the F/A-18. The Navy program, called Next-Generation Air Dominance, has moved beyond a purely conceptual phase and begun exploration of prototype systems and airframes as it pursues a new, carrier-launched 6th-Gen fighter to emerge in 2030 and beyond, service officials explained.

January 15, 2019

The U.S. military has been modernizing the armed forces in preparation for a potentially new era of warfare around the corner. 2018 was certainly a year jam-packed with defense headlines as the defense industry became re-energized across all sectors and innovation to meet the requirements of U.S. forces was reinvigorated. So as we kick off this new year, which defense stories should Americans be keeping an eye on?

January 15, 2019

On the latest episode of Recode Media with Peter Kafka, Recode’s Peter Kafka spoke with Harvard Law School professor Susan Crawford about her new book, Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution--And Why America Might Miss It. On the podcast, Crawford explained why nationwide access to high-speed fiber internet -- already standard in parts of Asia and Europe -- is important for everything from the future of work to the successful deployment of 5G wireless networks. She also talked about why Google’s ambitious attempt to compete with the telecom giants, Google Fiber, is all but dead.

January 14, 2019

If you’re a parent, you’ve probably despaired more than once at the sight of your kid indelibly glued to their smartphone. Philosophy professor Jordan Shapiro has a radical proposal: Don’t despair, rejoice. Better yet, join in. Kids aren’t losing themselves in their devices, but potentially finding themselves. What’s more, they’re doing exactly what generations of kids have long done: Immersing themselves in the toys and objects of the moment that reflect the society they inhabit, and which will help prepare them for the future.

January 14, 2019

"Alexa, what's 5 minus 3?" A 6-year-old boy recently asked that question in a video, which went viral on Twitter with more than 8.5 million views. He leaned over his homework as his mother hovered in the doorway. Alexa, Amazon's voice-activated assistant, delivered a quick answer: 2. "Booooy," the mother chastised her son.

January 14, 2019

The Internet of Things central promise is that by allowing internet and compute-enable products into your home, you can enjoy luxuries and conveniences like voice assistants, different colored light bulbs that change on command, and a really smart toaster. There are always going to be tensions between certain IoT devices and privacy.

January 13, 2019

President Donald Trump told H-1B visa holders to “rest assured” because “changes are soon coming which will bring both simplicity and certainty” to their status in the United States in a tweet early Friday. But it’s unclear whether the revisions he has in store will put the minds of the 85,000 immigrants brought to the U.S. on skilled work visas each year at ease.

January 13, 2019

“Whoever achieves quantum first is going to be able to break all the encryption that’s currently being used,” Hurd says. Right now, data that is encrypted, whether it’s a password, the plans for a new fighter plane, or the names and locations of intelligence officers, can be stolen, but can’t be read unless the thief can break the encryption code. When fully implemented, quantum technology will be able crack those codes, no matter how strong they are.

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