stem

May 21, 2019

Lawmakers moved on a host of bills this week centered around educational technology, including legislation aimed at restoring student privacy, bolstering the nation’s cybersecurity workforce, funding school security and better understanding participation in science and technology-related subjects among underrepresented groups.

May 21, 2019

The future of work in 21st-century America will be dominated by Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and computer science careers. To further enhance America's position as an innovative, globally competitive leader, job creators should look to our nation's veterans to fill these critical roles. Our veterans are uniquely positioned to excel in STEM and computer science roles.

May 20, 2019

Personnel working in cyber must continually look for opportunities to learn, say cyber professionals from across government. During a morning panel discussion on the final day of the AFCEA TechNet Cyber conference in Baltimore, high-ranking officials from the Defense Department, Department of Homeland Security and National Security Agency discussed a wide range of issues concerning the cyber workforce today and tomorrow.

May 20, 2019

With thousands of U.S. technology positions remaining unfilled every day, the need to grow a larger, more inclusive STEM workforce is clear. The challenge? How to proceed. We can help close the innovation workforce gap if we expand our investments in three key areas -- collaboration, inclusion and innovative educational policies -- including reauthorizing the Higher Education Act.

May 09, 2019

Lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives are taking an interest in creating more educational opportunities for students in the STEM field. On May 9, the House Science, Space and Technology Committee held a hearing on the STEM Opportunities Act, a bipartisan bill introduced by committee chairwoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) and ranking member Frank Lucas (R-Okla.)

May 09, 2019

The 21-year-old senior at the University of California at Davis wasn’t concerned about the academic rigor or long hours spent in the classroom — it was the uneasiness he felt when his peers and instructors watched him. Briscoe, who is African American, studies computer engineering at UC Davis, where black students constitute fewer than 3 percent of students in the program. Often, he is the only black student in his classes.

May 09, 2019

One-half of 1 percent. That’s how many Georgia students complete a computer science course as part of their high school curriculum. In an economy where every business is becoming a technology company - whether it’s a worldwide airline utilizing advanced logistics or a bicycle repair shop analyzing social media trends - it’s abundantly clear that we need to increase our focus on technological learning.

May 08, 2019

It was my great pleasure to be invited by Dr. Ronnie Lowenstein, ASTRA’s Advisor and Futurist, to participate in the “STEM on the Hill” reception on April 2, 2019 in the Russell Office Building, co-hosted by The Alliance for Science & Technology Research in America. I was delighted to attend because, like ASTRA and its partners, I recognize the prescient words of Dr. Martin Luther King, who just four days before his assassination in 1968, described “a triple revolution,” one of which was “… a technological revolution, with the impact of automation and cybernation….”(“Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution,” March 31, 1968, http://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/). Those words reinforce our current need to identify issue areas, innovative policies and organizational processes to help secure Dr. King’s visions of a cybernation.

May 08, 2019

You have STEM, which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Then there's STEAM, with the 'A' standing for arts. "We need to bring the arts into the STEAM because that's what's giving the creativity to be creative and to incorporate that into the STEM process," said Syracuse Schools Superintendent Jaime Alicea. But, that's not the feeling across the board.

May 07, 2019

In some ways, tech’s equity gaps reflect a simple supply and demand imbalance. But it is an imbalance with artificial constraints. Because while Black and Hispanic students now earn computer science degrees at twice the rate that they are hired by leading tech companies, they are all but invisible to most recruiters.

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