nasa

March 21, 2019

North Carolina State University graduate Christina Koch blasted off into space on the first ever all female spacewalk on Thursday. She’s just one of the many women who are paving the way for females entering STEM fields, which include working in and the study of science, technology, engineering and math.

March 20, 2019

Rocket science is easy. It's finding the funding for it that's hard. The Presidential Budget Request for NASA for the fiscal year 2020 is $21.019 billion -- higher than the FY2018 budget, and much higher than the lean years earlier this decade. At the same time, it also represents a 2.2% drop, nearly half a billion dollars, from the just-approved 2019 budget.

March 19, 2019

Satellites are physically quite secure orbiting the Earth, but the advent of cheaper high-power antennas makes them vulnerable in other ways. Engineers have only recently started taking cybersecurity seriously in satellite design, and as PCMag reports, that means hacking a satellite might not be as difficult as you think. Bill Malik, VP of Infrastructure Strategies at Trend Micro, calls the range of vulnerabilities exposed on satellites “astonishing.”

March 15, 2019

Chairwoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), Witnesses - Dr. Ellen Stofan, John and Adrienne Mars Director, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Former NASA Chief Scientist | Dr. Peggy A. Whitson, Technical Consultant and Former Astronaut | Mr. Frank A. Rose, Senior Fellow, Security and Strategy, The Brookings Institution, Former Assistant Secretary of State

March 14, 2019

A new rocket design under production by NASA won't be ready for a scheduled June 2020 launch, the agency's administrator told Congress on Wednesday. Jim Bridenstine told the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee that a mission to send an unmanned capsule around the moon next year, a three-week test flight for a manned mission planned for 2023, may need to be delayed unless the agency decides to go with privately owned rockets for the launch.

March 10, 2019

The SpaceX commercial astronaut capsule has splashed down successfully in the Atlantic Ocean, marking a significant step in Nasa’s quest to resume manned space flight from the US. Footage of the landing shows the capsule hitting the water gently under four billowing red and white parachutes. A boat, the GO Searcher, was waiting to recover the capsule, which splashed down about 280 miles (450 km) from Cape Canaveral in Florida.

March 03, 2019

A sleek new American-built capsule with just a test dummy aboard docked smoothly with the International Space Station on Sunday in a big step toward putting the U.S. back in the business of launching astronauts. The white, bullet-shaped Dragon capsule, developed by Elon Musk's SpaceX company under contract to NASA, closed in on the orbiting station nearly 260 miles above the Pacific Ocean and, flying autonomously, linked up on its own, without the help of the robotic arm normally used to guide spacecraft into position.

March 01, 2019

NASA has some good news, the world is a greener place today than it was 20 years ago. What prompted the change? Well, it appears China and India can take the majority of the credit. In contrast to the perception of China and India's willingness to overexploit land, water and resources for economic gain, the countries are responsible for the largest greening of the planet in the past two decades. The two most populous countries have implemented ambitious tree planting programs and scaled up their implementation and technology around agriculture.

February 25, 2019

WHEN it comes to illustrating humanity’s achievements in space, NASA’s back catalogue is as good as it gets. The images here are all part of a book tracing the agency’s 60 years of existence using more than 400 photographs. The big launches, moon landings, starscapes and Martian panoramas all make the cut, alongside plenty of striking views from behind the scenes, images that give a human scale to NASA’s vast technological endeavours.

February 19, 2019

Greenland’s ice sheet is the second largest body of ice in the world, so scientists are naturally interested in how it’s changing with the climate and what’s under there. Recent studies of the ice sheet with radar revealed something unexpected: an impact crater. What’s more unexpected than an impact crater? A second impact crater. NASA says it just spotted a second crater just over a hundred miles from the first one, and the team believes they formed at different times.

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