stem

June 27, 2018

With school out for the summer and the increasing focus on STEM there is a growing market for playing with STEM-centric toys; here are a few options to consider when shopping for summer distractions...

June 27, 2018

June 26, 2018 - Today, the Barbie® brand launches Robotics Engineer Barbie, a doll designed to pique girls' interest in STEM and shine a light on an underrepresented career field for women. This new doll joins a lineup of more than 200 careers held by Barbie, all of which reinforce the brand's purpose to inspire the limitless potential in every girl.

June 26, 2018

While teachers may always be the best line of defense for students falling behind, busy schedules don’t always permit the special attention and feedback that students need. That’s where artificial intelligence–powered teaching assistants might come in handy. “These intelligent tools can adapt pacing based on the student’s ability … and provide targeted, corrective feedback in case the student makes mistakes, so that the student can learn from them...

June 26, 2018

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), with the National Science Foundation (NSF), announced today that more than 140 individuals and organizations will be honored with presidential awards for their excellence in teaching or mentoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

June 26, 2018

After several years of Senate inaction, the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Chairman Lamar Alexander announced the markup of a bill to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act (Perkins Act). Enacted in 1984 to improve the academic and technical quality of vocational education, the Perkins Act provides federal funding for career and technical education (CTE) programs offered at the secondary or postsecondary level.

June 25, 2018

Panelists said closing the STEM skills gap not only is key to helping students secure jobs after graduation but also will help power the region's economy. "We've got to help people understand that they can succeed in STEM fields," said panelist Neil Matkin, president of Collin College. "The opportunities are there, but somewhere along the way it's either 'too hard' or 'I can't do it,' or 'Where does it lead?'"

June 25, 2018

In Kraig Kitts’ biology classes, it’s OK to fail. “That’s science. That’s the nature of it,” said Kitts, a science teacher at Center Grove High School. “Sometimes we don’t know. As teachers, we have a lot of pressures that everything works, every time, 100 percent.” This is the message Kitts wants to send to his students. It’s also the message he wants to relay to other Indiana teachers.

June 24, 2018

When FIRST originally launched 30 years ago as an afterschool robotics activity for high schoolers, the STEM movement was a nascent affair and such concepts as “makerspaces” and “hands-on experiential learning” had yet to take root. But as these movements found traction, FIRST has been there to add even more wind to the sails, using focused short-term robotics competitions and electrifying national championships to capture both the imaginations of K-12 students and the interests of instructors.

June 24, 2018

With a key Senate committee scheduled to consider legislation to reauthorize and modernize the Carl D. Perkins Act, policymakers have an opportunity to address this "skills gap" in a lasting way. This bill would prioritize existing federal education dollars for career and technical education (CTE) programs that better equip students with in demand skills.

June 22, 2018

It’s an economic dilemma that can be traced back to the types of knowledge and experiences students get in the classroom. Local initiatives and special academies are giving students more exposure to STEM, but community leaders during a panel Tuesday at Toyota Motor North America’s headquarters in Plano said more can be done. “When we look at the global landscape and we look at the competition that’s out there, STEM is critical to our future success and our prosperity,” said Andres Alcantar, chairman of the Texas Workforce Commission.

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