science

January 15, 2019

As the partial federal government shutdown enters its fourth week -- on January 12 becoming the longest in U.S. history -- scientists are increasingly feeling the impact. Thousands of federal workers who handle food safety and public health are furloughed. Countless projects researching everything from climate change to pest control to hurricane prediction are on hold.

January 10, 2019

Dinosaurs went extinct 65 million years ago because of a massive asteroid that hit the Earth in the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, now known as the Chicxulub crater. While it's been generally accepted that the asteroid caused a massive disruption in the planet's climate, a new study says the asteroid also caused a worldwide tsunami that reached more than 5,000 feet in the air.

January 09, 2019

What is the "dark side" of the moon? The short answer? It's a misnomer. A cool-sounding misnomer! But a misnomer. Assuming they aren't talking about the Pink Floyd album or the French mockumentary, people who say "the dark side of the moon" are almost always referring to the moon's far side--which, despite pointing permanently away from those of us planetside, actually sees as much sunlight as the side facing Earth.

January 04, 2019

To fully appreciate the Martian landscape, one needs dimension and movement. In the video you see here, Finnish filmmaker Jan Fröjdman transformed HiRISE imagery into a dynamic, three-dimensional, overhead view of the Red Planet--no glasses required.

January 03, 2019

As a retiring member and the outgoing chairman of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, I can no longer set that agenda, but I can recommend the issues that still need Congressional attention and action. Headlines claiming that Congress is making a “return to science” are ignoring years of progress on policies advancing research, STEM education, and space exploration. America’s continued success in technology, innovation, and energy development depends on a Science Committee that commits to working toward these goals.

January 03, 2019

Students across the United States are starting to feel in the impacts of the shutdown right now. From my lens as an atmospheric sciences professor at a major university and as a former president of the American Meteorological Society, here four ways (at least) that students are being affected.

January 03, 2019

ASTRA is pleased to announce that recently-resigned ASTRA Vice-Chairman Dr. Kelvin Droegemeier was confirmed by the U.S. Senate Wednesday night to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Droegemeier will be the White House’s top science and technology adviser, filling a critical administration role that had been vacant for nearly two years under President Trump. The position guides federal research spending and informs the government’s policies in areas such as artificial intelligence, climate change, precision medicine and online privacy. 

January 03, 2019

A NASA spacecraft 4 billion miles from Earth yielded its first close-up pictures Wednesday of the most distant celestial object ever explored, depicting what looks like a reddish snowman. Ultima Thule, as the small, icy object has been dubbed, was found to consist of two fused-together spheres, one of them three times bigger than the other, extending about 21 miles in length.

January 03, 2019

What science- and technology-related innovations and trends will come our way in 2019? Here, lightly edited, are predictions from 19 thought leaders across a variety of fields.

January 02, 2019

Scientists are still unsure if liquid water exists on Mars, but we know there’s plenty of water ice. The ice on Mars is usually diffuse and found in small pockets mixed with frozen carbon dioxide, but the Mars Express probe just beamed back images of a massive deposit of pristine water ice in an impact crater. This isn’t a new discovery, but it’s the best photo we’ve ever gotten of the Korolev crater.

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