research

February 11, 2019

Suppose a patient has an unusual brain infection, says Jennifer Gardy, a genomic epidemiologist who until recently was at the University of British Columbia and who was not involved with the project. Suppose it’s a pathogen that the doctor doesn’t recognize. Before BIGSI (BItsliced Genomic Signature Index), the pathogen’s particular sequence might have been hiding in one of those 500,000 genomes. But a mountain of data is only as good as your ability to search it.

February 05, 2019

The National Science Foundation (NSF), the fifth largest distributor of SBIR awards among federal agencies, received more than 20,000 proposals over the decade long period from 2008 to 2017, approving more than 3,600 (16.8 percent), according to an SSTI analysis of NSF data. NSF SBIR awards are the least concentrated of all federal agencies, as measured by share of awards going to firms with more than 10+ awards.

January 30, 2019

Unlike the United States, China can -- as an authoritarian regime -- dictate to the country’s research and development communities as well as industry what will filter into military applications. This civil-military fusion has enabled China to launch a series of what Defense Innovation Unit Managing Director Michael Brown called “so-called Manhattan projects” -- 16 of them in all -- “where they bring together government, business and academia to focus on making significant progress in a particular technology or industry sector.”

January 27, 2019

The longest U.S. government shutdown in history may soon be over, at least temporarily. But researchers shouldn’t expect their favorite federal research agency to be back to normal anytime soon. “Scientists will need to be patient,” warns Sarah Nusser, vice president for research at Iowa State University in Ames. “You’re not going to get all your questions answered immediately.”

January 25, 2019

If you bled when you brushed your teeth this morning, you might want to get that seen to. We may finally have found the long-elusive cause of Alzheimer’s disease: Porphyromonas gingivalis, the key bacteria in chronic gum disease. That’s bad, as gum disease affects around a third of all people. But the good news is that a drug that blocks the main toxins of P. gingivalis is entering major clinical trials this year, and research published today shows it might stop and even reverse Alzheimer’s.

January 24, 2019

If particle physicists get their way, new accelerators could one day scrutinize the most tantalizing subatomic particle in physics -- the Higgs boson. Six years after the particle's discovery at the Large Hadron Collider, scientists are planning enormous new machines that would stretch for tens of kilometers across Europe, Japan or China.

January 24, 2019

Amid a rise in Chinese cyber-theft and the huge growth in the numbers of Chinese exchange students and scholars, officials have stepped up pressure on administrators to take greater precautions to guard against espionage and efforts to steal American technologies and research data.

January 15, 2019

Every state government invested at least $1.0 million in research and development in FY 2017, according to recent data from the National Science Foundation’s National Center for Science and Education Statistics. During the three-year period from FY 2015 to FY 2017, California ($551.8 million per year), New York ($403.2 million per year), and Texas ($244.9 million per year) state governments averaged the most R&D expenditures. In FY 2017, these three states accounted for 49.8 percent of the national total, up from 45.6 percent of the total invested by state governments in 2012.

January 14, 2019

States invested $1.1 billion into health-related R&D expenditures in FY 2017 according to the newest results from the annual survey of state government R&D, conducted by the National Science Foundation.  Increasing by 13 percent from the previous year, health-related R&D helped push overall state government spending on R&D up by 7 percent over the 2016 figures.

January 09, 2019

The Trump administration has warned scientists doing biomedical research at American universities that they may be targets of Chinese spies trying to steal and exploit information from their laboratories. Scientists and universities receiving funds from the National Institutes of Health for cutting-edge research need to tighten their security procedures and take other precautions, said a panel of experts commissioned by the agency to investigate “foreign influences on research integrity.”

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