health

December 05, 2019

By James Carroll, Founder and CEO THOR Photomedicine Ltd

You probably do not need much reminding about America’s opioid crisis; the numbers are huge. CDC figures state that there are 100 million adults in the United States (US) affected by chronic pain, and over $600 billion a year are spent on health care costs related to pain and lost productivity. There were over 49,000 deaths associated with opioids in 2017—19,000 of which came from prescribed opioids.

November 26, 2019

Doctors have placed humans in suspended animation for the first time, as part of a trial in the US that aims to make it possible to fix traumatic injuries that would otherwise cause death. Samuel Tisherman, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, told New Scientist that his team of medics had placed at least one patient in suspended animation, calling it “a little surreal” when they first did it.

November 14, 2019

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) “will seek to learn more information about this mass collection of individuals’ medical records to ensure that HIPAA protections were fully implemented,” Roger Severino, the office’s director, said in a statement, referring to the federal law restricting the release of medical information.

November 12, 2019

Google LLC has been busily collecting health data on millions of Americans across 21 states, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday. The initiative, which Google seemed to have kept secret from the public, is codenamed “Project Nightingale.” Documents obtained by the Journal reveal that the heath data has been shared in partnership with St. Louis-based chain of hospitals called Ascension, a Catholic hospital that calls itself “a faith-based healthcare organization dedicated to transformation through innovation across the continuum of care.”

October 23, 2019

Friday, October 25, 2019, from 11:00am-12:00pm EDT -- Kinexum’s October public webcast features James D. Carroll, electronics engineer and Founder and CEO of THOR Photomedicine. Mr. Carroll will speak on “Why photobiomodulation, a light therapy medicine, might be the answer to the opioid crisis.” Click on read more link for more information and to register for this event.

October 15, 2019

“I think the old vo-tech days and the stereotypes that some people still have of technical education is so far from where we are today with the use of technology and how it’s integrated in all of our existing programs. Major change over the last 20 years,” said Southeast Technical Institute President, Bob Griggs. In the Licensed Practical Nurse Program students use simulators.

September 17, 2019

The length of time that a liver can be kept outside the body has been extended to a day and a half by a new “supercooling” method, which for the first time has let human organs be safely stored at sub-zero temperatures. The technique, which lowers the organ’s temperature below zero without forming damaging ice crystals, could boost the number of liver transplants carried out and could also be used on other organs, says Reinier de Vries of Harvard Medical School in Boston.

August 29, 2019

As 5G wireless technology is slowly making its way across the globe, many government agencies and organizations advise that there is no reason to be alarmed about the effects of radiofrequency waves on our health. But some experts strongly disagree.

August 24, 2019

A new era of cancer treatment just dawned, giving hope to America's 15.5 million cancer survivors, and the estimated 1.8 million who will be diagnosed with cancer this year. On June 22, 2019, the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) recommended the use of Photobiomodulation (PBM) as the standard of care for preventing and treating the side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

August 19, 2019

Human doctors once again fell short of artificial intelligence in a test to accurately diagnose breast cancer, adding yet more evidence that AI-aided diagnostics may soon be commonplace. Researchers at the University of Washington and UCLA created a system that was able to distinguish between a pair of conditions that human doctors often struggle to identify correctly.

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