federal budget

June 19, 2018

In April, the Congressional Budget Office reported the U.S. annual budget deficit will reach $1 trillion by 2020. That’s a troubling trajectory, but no one in Washington seems to care enough to stop spending money. I only see one answer. Washington needs to spend more money. Spending in one area now might actually help avert a fiscal apocalypse later.

March 28, 2018

The appropriations bill gives NASA $20.736 billion for the 2018 fiscal year, which started more than five and a half months ago. That is more than $1.6 billion above the administration’s original request of $19.092 billion. A House appropriations bill offered NASA $19.872 billion and its Senate counterpart $19.529 billion. An overarching two-year budget deal reached earlier this year raised spending caps for both defense and non-defense programs, freeing up additional funding.

March 25, 2018

Within the Department of Energy, every program will see at least a 10 percent increase in their budget. And advanced computing and fusion power research--a long-promised and oft-overhyped form of nuclear energy--get an extra raise. At this moment, 35 countries are collaborating on ITER, an experimental magnetic fusion device in southern France, and with this bill the US increased its investment to $122 million.

March 25, 2018

After teasing a potential veto of the colossal $1.3 trillion omnibus, President Donald Trump signed the spending bill into law Friday, touting it as a "matter of national security." "We had no choice but to fund our military because we have to have by far the strongest military in the world," Trump said during an impromptu White House press event. "You see the players out there, and you see what we are dealing with."

March 22, 2018

For the National Science Foundation (NSF) the bill provides a total of $7.8 billion which is $295 million or 4% over the FY17 level.  For Research and Related Activities, the bill provides $6.3 billion which represents a 5% increase over FY17.  The accompanying statement to the bill includes the following language with respect to marine seismology, “The agreement reiterates the importance of ensuring that NSF-funded marine research vessels with unique seismic capabilities remain available to the academic marine geology and geophysics community to support a variety of important undersea rese

March 08, 2018

The National Science Foundation (NSF) released more detailed information regarding President Donald J. Trump's Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 NSF budget request to Congress. The FY2019 budget request would represent a $7.47 billion investment in strengthening the nation's economy, security and global leadership through research in cutting-edge science and engineering.

February 13, 2018

On February 12, US President Donald Trump released his budget proposal for the 2019 fiscal year, which begins on 1 October 2018. Funding for the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health would hold steady after Congress agrees to lift spending caps, but details are fuzzy.

February 11, 2018

A two-year spending package, passed by Congress in the wee hours of February 9 and signed into law by President Trump hours later, could add to the coffers of U.S. science agencies. The bipartisan deal raises the caps on defense and nondefense discretionary spending by nearly $300 billion overall. Nondefense discretionary spending gets a $63 billion boost in fiscal year 2018, and another $68 billion in FY 2019 (the spending year that starts October 1, 2018).

January 11, 2018

The administration genuinely appears to be motivated to accomplish real human space exploration goals within its term of office. It remains unclear, however, whether a sufficient budget will actually be allotted to enable execution of its ambitious policy, either in whole or in part. Federal budgets are challenging—and will be for the foreseeable future--but there is an extremely compelling reason why the administration should go “all in” on this plan and propose a budget that will enable the United States to aggressively move forward.

January 03, 2018

Makers of just 10 drugs may have shortchanged the nation's Medicaid system by at least $1.3 billion from 2012 through 2016 by misclassifying their products in a rebate program, a government analysis found. The analysis also showed that while nearly 900 drugs may have been misclassified, in 2016 just four drugmakers were responsible for 54 percent of the potential misclassifications that led to the underpayments to the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program

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