Science & Technology

Senate panel approves bill to speed up driverless cars

October 05, 2017

A Senate panel approved bipartisan legislation on Wednesday to pave the way for driverless cars, representing the latest congressional step to address the emerging technology. After months of debate over whether to include trucks and buses in the measure, the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee agreed to advance a bill that would only remove certain obstacles for getting self-driving cars on the roads.

G.M. and Ford Lay Out Plans to Expand Electric Models

October 04, 2017

China has said it will eventually ban gasoline-powered cars. California may be moving in the same direction. That pressure has set off a scramble by the world’s car companies to embrace electric vehicles. On Monday, General Motors, America’s largest automaker, staked its claim to leadership. Outlining a fundamental shift in its vision of the industry, it announced plans for 20 new all-electric models by 2023, including two within the next 18 months.

Everything you've always wanted to know about fintech

October 04, 2017

The financial technology (fintech) industry is thriving globally and received $17.4 billion in investment last year alone. According to EY's Fintech Adoption Index, a third of consumers worldwide are using two or more fintech services, with 84 percent of customers saying they are aware of fintech (up 22 percent from the previous year).

NASA asteroid probe snaps farewell photo of Earth and Moon

October 03, 2017

OSIRIS-REx took a picture of the Earth-moon system on Monday (Sept. 25), a few days after performing a "gravity-assist" flyby of our planet that boosted its speed and helped set its course toward the 1,640-foot-wide (500 meters) asteroid Bennu.

Senate set to approve self-driving cars for US roadways

October 03, 2017

The US Senate today announced it had reached an agreement internally concerning self-driving car technology. The Senate is expected to pass legislation on October 4th that would clear regulations and restrictions for manufacturers, in essence providing a clear path to putting driverless cars on the road.

U.S. Air Force now 70 years old

October 02, 2017

The USAF was formed Sept. 18,1947, to secure the skies. Our airpower started in 1907 when the Army created the Aeronautical Division Signal Corps after witnessing the potential of aircraft developed by the Wright brothers. In World War I the Air Corps was made up of 12 officers, 54 enlisted men and just six aircraft.

Lockheed Martin unveils sleek, reusable lander for crewed Mars missions

October 02, 2017

A commercial effort to get humans into orbit around Mars in the late 2020s now includes a sleek vehicle to send astronauts down to the surface of the Red Planet. The aerospace company Lockheed Martin late Thursday (Sept. 28) revealed new details for its Mars Base Camp plan, an architecture aimed at building a crewed space station in orbit around the Red Planet that would support long-term exploration at Mars by astronauts on 1,000-day missions.

LIGO and Virgo observatories jointly detect black hole collision

October 02, 2017

In August, detectors on two continents recorded gravitational wave signals from a pair of black holes colliding. This discovery, announced today, is the first observation of gravitational waves by three different detectors, marking a new era of greater insights and improved localization of cosmic events now available through globally networked gravitational-wave observatories.

IBM now has more employees in India than in the US

October 01, 2017

The tech industry has been shifting jobs overseas for decades, and other big American companies like Oracle and Dell also employ a majority of their workers outside the United States. But IBM is unusual because it employs more people in a single foreign country than it does at home. The company's employment in India has nearly doubled since 2007, even as its work force in the United States has shrunk through waves of layoffs and buyouts.

A quantum computer to tackle fundamental science problems

September 29, 2017

For more than 50 years, Moore's Law has reigned supreme. The observation that the number of transistors on a computer chip doubles roughly every two years has set the pace for our modern digital revolution--making smartphones, personal computers and current supercomputers possible. But Moore's Law is slowing. And even if it wasn't, some of the big problems that scientists need to tackle might be beyond the reach of conventional computers.

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