Science & Technology

Weapons Makers Unveil A Herd of Robotanks - As the Army Worries about Battlefield Bandwidth

October 17, 2019

The show floor of the country’s biggest land-warfare convention was crowded with robot tanks this week, roughly two years after the U.S. Army’s declaration that its core 5-year priorities include a new combat vehicle. Among them, and with the greatest fanfare, Textron unveiled its Ripsaw, a 10-ton, 20-foot electrically-powered treaded minitank that can carry a small aerial drone on its back and can pop a smaller ground robot out of a front compartment.

Artificial Intelligence Has a Powerful Brain, but It Still Needs a Heart

October 17, 2019

So far, efforts to cultivate algorithmic fairness lag far behind the enthusiasm to adopt the technology. Industry, with its drive for competitive advantage and focus on profits, has shown little inclination to shoulder this responsibility. The institution that needs to play a critical role in leading the way to an AI-powered world that is both ethical and fair is higher education.

Why don't more women win Nobel Prizes in science?

October 17, 2019

The rarity of female Nobel laureates raises questions about women's exclusion from education and careers in science. Female researchers have come a long way over the past century. But there's overwhelming evidence that women remain underrepresented in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger

October 17, 2019

Two sources familiar confirmed to The Hill that the merger has been approved, with the three Republicans on the commission voting in favor and the two Democrats dissenting. But the merger is still facing a significant obstacle as a group of 17 state attorneys general forge ahead in their lawsuit to block the deal. The multistate lawsuit, announced over the summer, claims that the combined telecom giant would ramp up prices for consumers and result in significant job losses.

Robotics and the Future of Production and Work

October 16, 2019

The use of robotics will increase productivity and has the potential to bring more manufacturing production work back to developed countries. As productivity increases, labor is likely to receive a significant share of the benefits.

NASA engineer's 'helical engine' may violate the laws of physics

October 16, 2019

For every action, there is a reaction: that is the principle on which all space rockets operate, blasting propellant in one direction to travel in the other. But one NASA engineer believes he could take us to the stars without any propellant at all.

These are the new spacesuits for the first woman and next man on the moon

October 16, 2019

A human hasn't landed on the moon since 1972, but NASA's Artemis program aims to land the first woman and the next man on the lunar surface by 2024. Part of that process involves upgrading the classic spacesuits worn by Apollo-era astronauts in the 1960s and 70s.

Simulator Helps Nursing Students Learn at Southeast Tech

October 15, 2019

“I think the old vo-tech days and the stereotypes that some people still have of technical education is so far from where we are today with the use of technology and how it’s integrated in all of our existing programs. Major change over the last 20 years,” said Southeast Technical Institute President, Bob Griggs. In the Licensed Practical Nurse Program students use simulators.

SpaceX Could Launch NASA Astronauts Into Space in Early 2020

October 15, 2019

NASA wants private American vehicles to end this dependence and has been encouraging their development via its Commercial Crew Program. In September 2014, NASA awarded $2.6 billion to SpaceX and $4.2 billion to Boeing to finish work on their astronaut taxis -- capsules called Crew Dragon and the CST-100 Starliner, respectively. At the time, NASA officials said they wanted at least one of these vehicles to be up and running by the end of 2017.

Quantum weirdness could allow a person-sized wormhole to last forever

October 15, 2019

Fancy a trip down a wormhole? We have never been quite sure whether these portals through space-time could exist long enough for anything to travel through. Now calculations suggest they could stick around for a while - perhaps as long as the universe itself.

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