Education

Focus computer science funding on teacher training, Code.org founder says

October 29, 2017

Every dollar devoted to computer science education should be spent on professional development for teachers, said Hadi Partovi, the founder and CEO of Code.org. That includes “100 percent,” he said, of the $200 million the Trump administration has directed the U.S. Department of Education to spend on STEM and computer science programs each year.

College students want more technology, ECAR survey says

October 29, 2017

“The best things in life are free, but students want technology. And they want their instructors to use more of it in their courses,” the ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology 2017 reported. “Resistance is futile. Students’ preferences for courses that assimilate both face-to-face instructional components with technological features of the online environment continue to gain momentum across higher education.”

Once taboo, cellphones are free for thousands of Miami-Dade high school students

October 29, 2017

Once considered a distraction and banned from classrooms, cellphones have become a key technological tool in education. So much so, thousands of cell phones are being given out free to Miami-Dade high school students to boost their studying and connect with teachers.

Where will STEM education be in 5 years?

October 26, 2017

In 2015, there were nearly 8.6 million STEM jobs in the United States, and that number is growing every year. In fact, STEM job growth in the past 10 years is three times that of any other field, but by 2018, it is projected that 2.4 million STEM jobs will go unfilled. Yet, STEM education programs have not kept pace–calling into question whether there will be enough qualified employees available to take on these new positions.

6 Broad Trends Emerge for Future of Ed Tech

October 26, 2017

People researching education technology and learning science -- cyberlearning -- populate the landscape. A new report from the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning has undertaken the ambitious project of sifting through what those researchers are exploring to uncover the major trends and help us understand where education -- pre-K-12 and post-secondary -- may be headed over the next decade or two.

When Classroom Technology Impedes Student Learning

October 25, 2017

New research in the latest issue of Education Next does an elegant job of capturing the perils of ed tech. Researchers Susan Payne Carter, Kyle Greenberg, and Michael Walker report intriguing but disquieting findings from a randomized controlled classroom experiment conducted at West Point (for the in-the-weeds version of their study, check out the February 2017 Economics of Education Review).

7 Varied STEM Lesson and Learning Resources

October 25, 2017

As schools look for innovative ways to bring in STEM learning, here’s a possible road map for how to galvanize a school community.

Exploring the Top Benefits of Tech Gadgets for Education

October 25, 2017

Whether you are looking for the best Bluetooth earbuds to listen to the latest lecture that you recorded or you simply need a more sophisticated calculator, you know that certain gadgets are imperative to streamlining the education process. Learning more about how certain gadgets can benefit you when you are learning will help you to make sure that you have the ones that you need to get the most out of the material that you are studying.

The FBI is trying to attract high school students to STEM, cyber jobs

October 23, 2017

Hoping to nudge bright students toward degrees and eventual careers in cybersecurity, the FBI has deployed a pilot program in high schools nationwide, said Howard Marshall, deputy assistant director of the bureau’s cybersecurity division. The program, led by 10 different FBI field offices, encourages young people to engage in and study science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Have Math Anxiety? Here's How to Not Pass It Down to Your Kid

October 23, 2017

It turns out that parents’ fear of math can be passed along to our kids without us realizing it. Many adults have had a point (or several) in their lives when they declared themselves “not a math person,” and that’s understandable. Education experts say the way students have traditionally been trained in math--with timed tests, long lists of rules to memorize, and even the assumption that 100 percent is the ideal score--is not only stress-inducing, but ineffective.

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